The Lion, the Jackal, and the Goat – Panchatantra Story With Moral (in English)

Introduction of ‘The Lion, the Jackal, and the Goat’ Panchatantra Story

“The Lion, the Jackal, and the Goat” is a story from the ancient Indian collection of animal fables and moral stories known as the Panchatantra. The story goes as follows:

There was once a lion who was very hungry and came across a goat grazing in a field. The lion caught the goat and was about to eat it when a jackal came by and begged the lion to spare the goat’s life. The jackal told the lion that he knew of a much bigger and fatter goat that they could catch together.

The lion agreed and the two set off to find the bigger goat. Along the way, the jackal told the lion that the goat was actually in a cave and that the lion would have to go in alone to catch it. The lion, eager to catch the bigger goat, went into the cave and the jackal closed the entrance behind him, trapping the lion inside.

The jackal then went back to the goat and set it free, saying that it was a good thing that the lion was now trapped in the cave. The moral of the story is that it is important to be cautious of those who try to deceive or trick you, and to think carefully before making decisions.

The Lion, the Jackal, and the Goat – Panchatantra Story

Once upon a time, in a dense forest, there lived a lion, a jackal, and a goat. The lion was the king of the forest, feared and respected by all the other animals. The jackal was a sly and cunning creature, always looking for ways to get ahead and outsmart the other animals. The goat was a simple and innocent animal, living a peaceful life in the forest.

One day, the lion caught a deer and invited the jackal and the goat to share in the feast. The jackal was delighted at the prospect of a delicious meal and eagerly accepted the invitation. The goat, however, was hesitant and afraid, as he knew that the lion was known to eat goats.

The lion reassured the goat that he had nothing to fear and that he was welcome to join in the feast. So, the goat reluctantly agreed and joined the lion and the jackal.

As they feasted on the deer, the jackal began to flatter the lion, telling him how mighty and powerful he was and how all the animals in the forest were in awe of him. The lion, enjoying the praise, asked the jackal what he would like as a reward for his kind words.

The jackal, thinking quickly, asked the lion to grant him the privilege of being the first to eat the goat. The lion, thinking that this was a strange request, asked the jackal why he wanted to eat the goat. The jackal replied that the goat was old and weak, and that it would be a mercy to put him out of his misery.

The lion, feeling sorry for the goat, agreed to the jackal’s request and granted him the privilege of being the first to eat the goat. The goat, realizing what was happening, begged the lion to spare his life and offered to do any task in return.

The lion, moved by the goat’s plea, granted him his life and allowed him to go free. The goat, grateful to be spared, ran back to his home and vowed never to be tricked by the sly jackal again. The jackal, disappointed at not getting to eat the goat, slunk away, feeling foolish for not realizing that the lion would never go back on his word.

The moral of the story “The Lion, the Jackal, and the Goat” is that honesty and loyalty are important values to uphold, and that trying to deceive or manipulate others will ultimately lead to disappointment and failure. The story teaches us that it is important to be true to ourselves and to treat others with kindness and respect, rather than trying to gain an advantage through cunning or deceit.

Moral of the Story

The moral of the story “The Lion, the Jackal, and the Goat” is that honesty and loyalty are important values to uphold, and that trying to deceive or manipulate others will ultimately lead to disappointment and failure. The story teaches us that it is important to be true to ourselves and to treat others with kindness and respect, rather than trying to gain an advantage through cunning or deceit. The jackal’s actions in the story demonstrate the dangers of being dishonest and manipulative, and the consequences of these actions, as he ultimately fails in his attempt to deceive the lion and eat the goat. On the other hand, the goat’s honesty and loyalty are rewarded when the lion grants him his life and allows him to go free.

Leave a Comment

Scroll to Top