Tulsi Museum Ramvan: Complete Historical Review & Information

The Tulsi Museum, located 16 km from the city of Satna in Ramvan, is a renowned archaeological museum showcasing unique local artistic sculptures from ancient times. Established in 1977, the museum, also known as Tulsi Sangrahalaya, boasts a stunning collection of sculptures made from various materials such as terracotta, birch ark, and palm leaf, as well as rare copper coins, copper plates, and gold and silver sculptures.

Open daily except for Mondays, the museum is a must-visit for anyone interested in exploring the rich cultural and historical heritage of the area. With its exquisite collections and commitment to preserving ancient art, the Tulsi Museum is an important hub of Satna tourism. In this article, we aim to provide a comprehensive guide to the Tulsi Museum in Ramvan, Satna District, Madhya Pradesh (MP).

Tulsi Museum Ramvan, Satna

The Tulsi Museum in Ramvan is a treasure trove of history and heritage, attracting visitors from all over who come to experience its rich and diverse collection. Established in 1977, this archaeological museum is home to an array of precious artifacts from ancient times, including sculptures made from terracotta, birch bark, and palm leaves, as well as rare copper coins, gold, and silver pieces.

With 9 galleries showcasing the works of various cultures and civilizations, including Bharahut, Gupta, Jaina, Saiva, and Vaishnava, the museum is a testament to the glorious past of the region. In total, it houses 2368 objects, including 1135 coins of which 8 are gold, 245 are silver, and 842 are made of copper. Visitors can also see coins and artifacts from other historical periods, including the Kushana, Naga, Gupta, and Mughal eras.

Tulsi Museum Building

The objects on display at the museum have been sourced from a range of locations across India, including Bharahut, Bhumra, Uchera, Doha, Jaso, and many more, as well as from Bhita in Uttar Pradesh, Bodh Gaya in Bihar, and even Kathmandu in Nepal. With so many fascinating pieces on display, the Tulsi Museum is a must-visit for anyone interested in learning about the rich cultural heritage of the Ramvan region.

The various sculptures displayed in the Tulsi Museum can be seen in its several galleries, including:

  • Bharahut Gallery
  • Gupta Period Gallery
  • Jaina Gallery
  • Saiva and Vyantara Deities Gallery
  • Vaishnava Gallery
  • Reserve Collection (Remarkable Sculptures)
  • Collection of Coins

These galleries showcase a diverse range of sculptures, each reflecting the unique artistic styles and cultural traditions of different periods and civilizations. Whether it’s intricate terracotta pieces, stunning birch bark sculptures, or rare gold and silver coins, there’s something for everyone at the Tulsi Museum.

Bharahut Gallery

The Bharahut Gallery, located within the Tulshi Museum, is a significant exhibit that showcases 81 handpicked artifacts. These pieces have been sourced from the extensive collection housed at the Indian Museum in Kolkata and consist of a diverse range of elements, including fragments of Vedika railings, beautifully carved pillars, delicate lotus motifs, and pillar tops (stambha-sirsha). The artifacts displayed in this gallery offer a unique glimpse into the rich cultural heritage of ancient India and are a testament to the remarkable craftsmanship of the period.

Veenadhari Siva Parvati in Bharahut Gallery Tulsi Museum Ramvan
Veenadhari Siva Parvati in Bharahut Gallery Tulsi Museum Ramvan

Gupta Period Gallery

The Gupta Period Gallery is an exciting display of art and artifacts, showcasing objects collected from several archaeological sites including Khoh, Bhumra, Dureha, and Bhatura. This gallery is a true treasure trove for history and art enthusiasts, featuring a remarkable selection of sculptures, including impressive representations of Lord Shiva, Parshwanath, Veenadhari Shiva, Parvati, and Saiva-ganas, as well as depictions of the powerful goddess Mahismardini and graceful deer sculptures. Each of these objects provides an insightful look into the cultural, religious and artistic achievements of the Gupta period, and are a testament to the remarkable artistic talent and skill of the artists of that time.

Jaina Gallery

The Jaina Gallery of the Tulsi Museum is a showcase of the stunning stone sculptures of the Kalchuri period, collected from various locations such as Gurgi, Marahi, and Amarpatan. The highlight of this gallery is the magnificent statue of Parshwanatha, the 23rd Tirthankara, which is considered to be of great importance.

In addition to Parshwanatha, the gallery also features other notable sculptures of Aadinatha, Chandraprabhu, and Neminatha. These works of art date back to the 11th and 12th centuries AD, and offer a fascinating glimpse into the rich cultural and religious heritage of the period. With its intricate details and timeless beauty, the Jaina Gallery is a must-visit for anyone interested in learning about the artistic and spiritual traditions of ancient India.

Saiva and Vyantara Deities Gallery

The Saiva and Vyantara Deities Gallery is a mesmerizing exhibit, showcasing an array of Saiva sculptures gathered from Uchera, Sohagpur, and Babupur. This gallery is a visual delight, featuring breathtaking representations of the divine duo Uma-Maheshwar and the serene Veenadhar Shiva, as well as several other powerful and gracefully crafted figures such as Chamunda, Yogini, Surya, Dikpalas, Yam-Nairiti, and Varun. Each of these sculptures is a masterful work of art, displaying the exceptional skills of the sculptors who created them and offering a fascinating glimpse into the religious and cultural practices of ancient India.

Vaishnava Gallery

The Vaishnava Gallery is a remarkable showcase of the finest sculptures dedicated to Lord Vishnu and his incarnations. This gallery houses a magnificent collection of sculptures, including majestic representations of Vishnu, the divine couple Lakshmi-Narayana, and Bhu-varaha. These sculptures were created during the late medieval period and have been carefully gathered from various sites in the Vindhyan region, including Sohagpur, Babupur, Satri, and Nachna. Each of these masterpieces is a testament to the exceptional artistry and devotion of the sculptors who created them, and offers a unique glimpse into the religious and cultural practices of ancient India.

Reserve Collection (Remarkable Sculptures)

The Reserve Collection of the Tulsi Museum is a remarkable display of some of the most exquisite sculptures to be found in the region. Two miniature stupas from the Gupta period, procured from the revered site of Bodh Gaya, take pride of place in this collection. The first stupa features Dhyani Buddha on all four cardinal directions, while the second depicts a Dhyani Buddha on one side and is accompanied by a chatra, harmika, and vedika.

Another notable piece in the Reserve Collection is a unique Vishnu head from Sohagpur, which dates back to the Kalchuri period. This collection also features a diverse array of sculptures from different religious traditions, including 70 art pieces from Buddhism, 75 from Jainism, 90 from Vaishnavism, and 65 from Saivism. With such a rich and varied array of sculptures on display, the Reserve Collection of the Tulsi Museum is a must-visit for art lovers, historians, and anyone interested in exploring the rich cultural heritage of the region.

Collection of Coins

The Collection of Coins Gallery at the Tulsi Museum is a rare and fascinating exhibit that houses a diverse array of 1135 coins, including a noteworthy collection of 8 gold coins, 245 silver coins, and 842 copper coins. This gallery also showcases a significant collection of copper punch marked and coins from various periods, including the Kushana, Naga, Gupta, and Mughal dynasties. This collection is truly unique and diverse, featuring coins from regional, state, and foreign states, making it a must-visit for coin collectors and history enthusiasts alike. The preservation and display of this rare collection of coins is a testament to the importance placed on preserving the cultural and historical heritage of India.

Overview

Opening & Closing Time of MuseumMorning 10.00 AM to Evening 5.00 PM
Entry Fee (Indian Citizen)Rs 10
Entry Fee (Foreigner)Rs 100
Photography FeeRs. 50 each camera
Videography FeeRs. 200 each camera

Notes:

  • Children below the age of 15 and handicapped individuals are exempt from entry fees
  • Museum is closed on Mondays and on government-observed holidays
  • A variety of departmental publications, books, folders, postcards, and plaster cast replicas are available for purchase at the sales counter.

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